Protect Hardwood Floors From Chairs and Furniture

Photo Courtesy: Bona

Photo Courtesy: Bona

In the realm of floor care, a lot of attention is placed on protecting floors against outside contaminants and making sure everyone in the home is aware of good floor-friendly habits.

Sometimes, furniture and chair legs can get overlooked as potential sources of floor damage. Unprotected furniture and chair legs can still grind grit and debris into your floor’s finish. Greater concern for scratches and gouges comes from heavier pieces of furniture. For another added layer of hardwood floor protection, chairs and furniture legs need to be made more floor-friendly.

Furniture Protection Types

A popular form of chair leg protection is the chair glide or furniture pad. Quite simply, these are pads made of different types of material that are put on the bottoms of your chair legs. There are different types of chair glides, each offering different levels of cost and protection.

Tap-on/nail-on pads. These types of pads are very secure since they are attached to the furniture leg with either a small nail or screw. Tap-on pads use different materials to make contact with your floor, depending on your floor type. Care should be used with tap-on pads because if they are not properly installed, the nail or screw may be exposed to harm your floor.

Self-adhesive pads. These are peel-and-stick pads that can be found almost everywhere. They are typically made of felt or rubber and are the least expensive. However, the adhesive on these pads won’t last as long as tap-on or slip-on pads.

Slip-on pads. These pads are made to fit over a chair leg and are often made of rubber or soft plastic. These won’t have a problem of falling off like a self-adhesive pad or have the potential to scratch your floor like a broken tap-on pad.

Floor Type Matters

While most chair glides and furniture pads are sold as universal pads for all floor types, some consideration is needed for the floor type you have. Common materials to make chair glides and furniture pads are felt, rubber, cork, plastic and metal. Be especially careful with chair glides since they are made to help furniture move on the floor. Choosing the wrong material with chair glides can lead to floor damage.

Carpet. A harder material like steel or plastic work best.

Hard Floors (hardwood, ceramic tile). Felt and rubber work best. If using rubber, be wary of potential scuff marks. Make sure the felt is thick enough for even heavy furniture.

Soft floors (vinyl, rubber). Felt, rubber and plastic work best.

Furniture Traffic Considerations

Just like foot traffic, how often your furniture moves will play a part in choosing the right type of furniture pad or chair glide. For heavy pieces of furniture that won’t be moved at all, you have a wider range of furniture pads to choose from. Thick pieces of felt or rubber work well with heavy furniture.

In dining rooms or kitchens, you will have high furniture traffic, so choosing a felt pad can be a good option. Plastic pads or glides will wear down over time, so be sure to check the life of your chair glides periodically. Depending on your kitchen floor, rubber might need to be avoided for scuff marks.

In family rooms with couches and sofas, consider how hard the furniture will be treated. Will kids jump on the couch, or will you plop down in your favorite chair after a long day of work? These types of actions will cause small movements, so choose your furniture pad wisely. A rubber pad can do well in this scenario since it will help to restrict furniture movement.

Source: Bona

Top Kitchen Remodeling Projects for Ultimate ROI

daltile Photo

Photo: daltile

It’s a well-established fact that improvements to the kitchen are one of the best things you can do to increase the value of your home. Market Watch recently stated that the average minor kitchen remodel brings a return of 82.7 percent. Major kitchen remodels bring an expected return on investment of 74.2 percent.

Whether you’re getting ready to sell your home or are making improvements for the long haul, giving the kitchen a facelift does wonders. Here are three of the most profitable projects to increase the value of your home.

Redesign the Backsplash

Redesigning the backsplash can be as simple or complex as your budget allows and it can redefine the room to give you that new look you’re going for. Get outside the box with a uniquely shaped tile, fresh color or a new layout.

If you’re planning a major overhaul, you have many more options to consider. As long as the cupboards are ripped out, why not reconsider extending your backsplash up the wall? Traditional backsplashes are usually limited to a few inches around the sink and stove. Tiled walls are durable and easy to clean. They let you make a contemporary design statement as well.

Get a Slab Countertop

A slab countertop is durable and gives you a continuous look that makes your kitchen look high-end. Nothing can quite match the elegance of natural stone countertops. Natural stone does require some special care so take that into account as you design your new kitchen.

If you love the look of natural stone but aren’t sure about the maintenance, check out engineered stone surfaces. More than 90 percent natural stone, these products give you the color and textures you want plus they can be stronger than granite and resist scratching, heat and stains better than granite. They are pretty much maintenance-free.

Upgrade the Tile Flooring

If your big plans are interfering with the budget, a good mid-range option with lots of possibilities is porcelain tile. Porcelain tile comes in just about every color, texture and design you could possibly imagine.

Want to create a classic farm house kitchen? Think about wood tile. Want natural marble floors but it’s way out of the budget? Try a porcelain tile that mimics the veining and depth of natural stone. Porcelain doesn’t require the special treatment that hardwood or natural stone do.

Updating your kitchen is always a good investment. Get the best return on your investment with the right tile selections.

Source: daltile

Environmental Benefits of Wood Floors

Photo: Shaw Floors

Photo: Shaw Floors

Wood flooring is the most abundantly renewable flooring material available. Sustainable forest management makes it possible to harvest wood without any serious impact on the environment, because trees are a renewable resource that can be replaced time and time again.

Check out these environmental facts about wood floors:

  • The average annual net growth for hardwoods is greater than average annual removals. (Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service)
  • Indoor air quality is better with wood floors. (Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency)
  • Wood is a carbon neutral product that produces oxygen during its growth cycle and stores carbon during its service life. (Source: University of Wisconsin Wood Products Program Solid Wood Flooring Life Cycle Analysis)
  • Wood floors use less water and energy to produce than other flooring options. (Source: University of Wisconsin Wood Products Program Solid Wood Flooring Life Cycle Analysis)
  • At the end of its service life, wood flooring can be burned as fuel or recycled.(Source: University of Wisconsin Wood Products Program Solid Wood Flooring Life Cycle Analysis)
  • Wood floors last hundreds of years, so they won’t need to be replaced as often as other flooring options. (Source: National Association of Home Builders)
  • While it takes most hardwood trees 40-60 years to mature, the inventory planted today won’t be needed for 100+ years. (Source: National Wood Flooring Association)

Why do you like wood floors? Do you have them in your home?

Source: National Wood Flooring Association