Wood Flooring Options for Your Home

Wood flooring is timeless, elegant and unique, making it a good option for today’s homeowners. It also can be customized to reflect your design tastes. This brief video from Bona provides more information on widths, styles and grades of wood flooring.

Scratches on Your Wood Floors?

This brief video offers tips on how to prevent scratches on your wood floors and what you can do about them if they are already there.

Did you know MODA Floors & Interiors is a Bona Certified Craftsman?

Source: Bona

Hardwood Flooring Installation: Which is Best?

Photo: Bona

Photo: Bona

Hardwood floor installation is a project that can be done by seasoned professional contractors or by skilled “Do It Yourselfers” ambitious enough to attempt the job themselves. If you’re considering installing your own floor, be sure you understand the different types of hardwood floor installation. The subfloor you will be installing the new floor on may dictate which hardwood floor installation method you can use.

Nail/Staple Down

Hardwood floor installation using the nail-down method is typically used for solid wood flooring of ¾” thick strip or plank flooring to a wooden sub-floor. The flooring cleats are driven down through the tongue of the flooring and fasten securely in the sub-floor beneath.

Floating

A floating floor is engineered hardwood that is installed by attaching each board to the next without any adherence to the sub-floor. The boards are attached using a bead of glue on the tongue or by a click-together system. Floating floors are easier to install for a DIY project and can generally be installed over existing flooring such as tile or vinyl. When nailing or gluing flooring down, each board expands and contracts independently. On a floating system, the entire floor moves as one unit which will help reduce any cracks between boards in areas of fluctuating temperature/humidity levels. Floating floors can also be sanded dependent on how thick the wear layer is.

Glue Down

Glue is primarily used to attach hardwood flooring to fully cured and dry concrete substrates or wood when nailing is just not an option. Glue is also used as a sound reduction barrier and can help soften the transfer of noise when hardwood is installed in applications such as apartment buildings and high-rises. Hardwood that is installed using the nail down method can tend to have higher noise transfer between floors. Please refer to the flooring manufacturer for recommendations on installation.

Nail/Glue Down

In some cases when installing plank flooring 4” and wider, nailing and gluing the boards are recommended. Refer to the flooring manufacturer or the National Oak Flooring Manufacturers Association (NOFMA.org) for recommendations on installation.

If you’re looking for someone to install your hardwood floor, contact a Bona Certified Craftsman to explore your options. A Bona Certified Craftsman (like MODA Floors and Interiors) is a professional contractor specially trained in the Bona Floor Care System and can provide you with a wealth of experience and expertise concerning hardwood floors.

Source: Bona

How to Remove Water Stains on Wood Floors

Many people have plants in plant pots sitting directly on their wood floor. Often, plant pots leak without your noticing when you water the flowers. When you move the pots to vacuum you see dark round spots on your wood floor.

Photo Courtesy: Bona

Photo Courtesy: Bona

Here are some tips on how to remove those stains.

On lacquered floors:

  • Move the plant pot and wipe up any liquid. Let dry, and keep well ventilated for 24 hours.
  • If you can still see the stain, it means the fluid has soaked into the wood.
  • Bona recommends contacting a Bona Certified Craftsman (like MODA Floors & Interiors) for more advice and practical help.

On oiled floors:

  • Move the plant pot and wipe up any liquid. Let dry, and keep well ventilated for 24 hours.
  • Spray the surface with Cleaner for Oiled Floors, use a Microfiber Cleaning Pad and let dry thoroughly. If you see a dark color or ring in the wood, it indicates that water has soaked into the wood. To fix the stain, sand the surface with very fine sandpaper. Then add oil to where the stain was. Be sure to choose the same oil you used previously. If you’re not sure and need assistance, contact a Bona Certified Craftsman for further advice and practical help.

Tips:

  • Always put plant pots on saucers with felt pads or other protection to collect water and moisture.
  • Move your plant pots occasionally so that they dont stand in the same place for too long. This will avoid color changes from sunlight.

Source: www.Bona.com

 

Wood Floors: What’s the Difference?

Photo Courtesy Bona

Site-finished floors are wood floors that are sanded and finished after installed in a home. These floors are left up to the homeowner’s imagination with an extensive pallet of stain colors and finishes to choose from. The sanding process can help eliminate any imperfections throughout the floor, giving you a cleaner, more uniform look.

Today’s advances in technology can allow for a quick, clean and healthy finishing process. Having your floors sanded on site does mean having to stay off your floors for the duration of the sanding and finishing process. In the past this was a long and messy process with extensive clean up. With today’s advances in technology, there are dust containment vacuums and low VOC finishes that allow for a quick, clean and healthy process.

Pre-finished floors have the finish applied in a factory using a UV curing process. They come in a wide variety of species, colors, thicknesses, widths and character grades but can be limited on the ability to be sanded due to the thinner wear layers. Once installed, pre-finished flooring is ready to be used and there is no sanding, dust or fumes from the finishing process.

MODA Floors & Interiors has trained Bona Certified Craftsmen on staff to ensure a quality installation.

Source: Bona